Price Controlled Items This Deepavali



So Deepavali is just around the corner. Diwali is actually celebrated to commemorate the triumph of good over evil. There are many stories based in ancient Hindu scriptures that explains the origin of this festival, but perhaps the most common one is that thousands of years ago the demon Narakasura terrorized innocent folks and with the aid of Lord Krishna, Narakasura was destroyed and the people were rejoiced. Thus Deepavali was born. What better way to celebrate than to light up the city with lights! hence why Deepavali is also known as the festival of lights. Deep means “light” and avali “a row” to become “a row of lights.

Okay, now that we had our quick history lesson, lets see the other side of Deepavali that has nothing to celebrate about. THE MONEY INVOLVED!. Every year during Deepavali, many Hindus splurge on so many things, clothes, food, fireworks, furniture and the lists goes on. So it’s about time we rethink how we spend and to help us do that, here’s a list of 16 items under price control for this coming festival of lights.

  1. Good ol’ Chicken

Did you know we actually have three types of chicken? There’s live chicken and standard chicken. I’ll get to the third one in a bit. Live chicken would costs you RM5.30 per kg whole sale and RM5.80 per kg retail.

Now for the third chicken, the Super chicken. Yes you read it correct. Don’t go looking around for a chicken with a cape fighting crime at your local market but rather try looking for one that is decapitated, feet less lying on the shelve empty and hollow. Super Chicken is basically slaughtered and dressed without leg, head, liver and gizzard. This goes for RM7.30 per kg whole sale and RM8.10 per kg retail.

2. Lamb or Goat

Lamb or mutton is really and acquired taste but its a very common dish for any Hindu household during Deepavali. For the local lamb the price per kg is RM44 whole sale and RM47 per kg retail while the price for importer goat or mutton is RM20 per kg wholesale and RM47 per kg retail.

3. Chicken Egg

Eggs are not commonly served during Deepavali but its perhaps used alot for baking cookies and cakes. There are 3 grades of eggs and their all priced differently. Grade A eggs costs RM0.36 each wholesale and RM0.38 each retail. Grade B eggs are priced at RM0.35 each wholesale and RM0.37 each retail while Grade C eggs goes for RM0.34 wholesale and RM0.36 each retail.

Read also : What You Must Know About The Festive Season Price Control

4. Red Chilies 

Lets be honest, Indian food without chilies? Common! Red or green, it has to be in. These little fiery red needles would costs you RM3.50 per kg wholesale and RM4.50 per kg retail.

5. Tomatoes 

Who can resist a sweet sour tomato puree dripping down that scrumptious Indian savory dish. Sounds good? of course it does. But does the price sounds good too? you be the judge. A kg of these tomatoes would cost RM11 wholesale and RM13 per kg retail.

6. Coconut

Not only good for your daughter, they are a must in most Indian delicacies. These are priced at RM1.90 flat while grated coconut is priced at RM7.20 per kg retail.

Must Read : How to Beat Financial Temptation

7. Onions

Its bad enough that they make us cry all the time, how much they cost would perhaps make you weep, at-least for me. Small red onions are priced at RM4.80 per kg wholesale and RM5.80 retail per kg. The normal sized onions on the other hand costs a lot cheaper at RM1.80 per kg wholesale and RM2.80 per kg retail. Wonder why the smaller ones are cheaper?

8. Potatoes

I love my potatoes soft and a little mushy. Anyways these are going at RM1.80 per kg whole sale and RM2.80 per kg retail.

9. Dhal Bean

Dhal or most commonly known as ‘Parupu’ is by far in my opinion the most famous Indian dish ever. And thank god their affordable. But then again depends on how much you are cooking. They go at RM2.50 per kg wholesale and RM3.50 per kg retail.

Now that should help you in terms of managing your grocery budget this coming Deepavali. Be sure to always spend your money wisely. Have a wonderful Deepavali!

(Video Source : The Kitchen Club YouTube Channel)